Gossiping Stars

The Hollywood variety are known to be chatty, and it turns out that the interstellar variety are as well.

Stars are ‘talking’ to each other, according to research performed by leading Astronomer Franz Keg at Munich ASL Observatory.

“It has taken over a decade, for the delay of communication is still governed by the speed of light. We have recorded a conversation between our star and one of the nearest, Barnard’s Star,” he says, “It is still up for analysis whether there is a proper grammar and structure.”

The report says that the ‘hot topic’ is a supernova that happened 150 years ago – yesterday in solar terms. Flares, sun spots, and strong magnetic fields send out an enormously complex signal that is being received, in a decade or so, by other stars.

“While we have only discovered three parts of a conversation, we expect there to be more as the years go on and our research continues. Alpha Centauri was has been too complicated, as the triple system is too noisy, much like a gaggle of geese,” he says, “As the Earth travels through the solar wind, it is like sitting on the telephone wire, listening in to the gossip.”ChesterLogoSmall

Good Robot!

Digital emotions aren’t new. Tamagochi, a children’s craze back in the 90’s, gave us a virtual pet that came with emotions, and responded to stylised pleasure and punishment.

Now engineers are looking to put that concept into the next advance in robotic control.

“Fuzzy logic is great for washing machines, and determinate, adaptive algorithms work for menial tasks. If you look to the animal world, the higher orders of animals are trainable not through direct logic and signals, but through pleasure and pain,” says Doctor Gerard Jung, lead roboticist in Germany’s Klein-Bach Laboratories.

“The beauty of pleasure and pain receptors means that the robot is trained not by a set of pre-calculated goals, rather the various environmental factors, including and especially humans, determine what is right and wrong,” he explains, “This way we let the robot ‘figure out’ what it is meant to do, create its own goals and boundaries. It’s very much like training a small dog or a young child. It’s not quite ‘right and wrong’ in a moralistic sense, it’s physically based at this stage.”

He says that the technology will ease the pathway of getting robots into the household and would lead to eventual robot ‘buddies’, one that could listen and actively sympathise with their owners.ChesterLogoSmall