Hats off to your brain

Wearing a close fitting hat is a way to decrease one’s intelligence, according to Manfred Toule and his team of scientists. In a study involving more than five hundred candidates, the figures show that wearing and not wearing a hat creates a noticeable change in the apparent IQ.

“We had our candidates perform a set of tests over several days. Some wore hats first, others wore hats second, some wore none at all,” he says, “Those who wore no head-wear deomnstrated a relatively constant IQ. Those who wore hats, however, had an almost consistent 13% decrease in their apparent IQ on the days when their heads were covered.”

The teams first embarked on the research after they noticed that, in a separate study involving hair and intelligence, those with less on top tended to have more up top.

“The theory is that the brain, being so large in the human body, requires a very temperature regulated environment. One of the reasons we perspire so much, for example, and have such a large surface area on our head, is to shed the excess heat. Our cooling ability works quite well, so the ambient temperature normally doesn’t play a significant role in our ability to think.”

Tight or insulated head-wear, though, changes the way the body regulates its temperature and, as a result, the cranial temperature increases and this, he says, appears to be the main reason for the drop in intelligence.

“We have also experimented with the type of hat. Large, open space hats, like top-hats or stove-pipe hats, don’t exhibit as severe a drop, whereas woolen beanies, caps and ushankas all push the IQ down.”

Manfred has enlisted a design engineer to create a head cooling apparatus to see if a drop in cranial temperature results in a change in IQ, also.

“If it turns out that there is an optimal temperature for thinking, we may soon see a market for devices like this in offices, laboratories, anywhere that requires brain power. And why not? Athletes have specialised clothes to ensure their body runs efficiently, why not intellectuals?”

Manfred’s research is expected to be completed next year.

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Good Vibrations

The air we breathe, the food we eat and the water we drink all play a part in affecting our health. Now scientists are looking at vibration frequencies and how they affect our bodies.

“We know that certain frequencies can positively and negatively affect our bodies, from blood flow, to muscle development, even brain function. We have seen that there are some stimulus and response ‘notes’ that, when hit, resonate certain parts of our bodies,” says Deak Gorbon, curator of the study.

It was shown that certain low frequencies affect the heart rate of participants, along with blood sugar levels, mental aptitude and problem solving capabilities. On the flip side, higher frequencies can result in reduced oxygen levels at the extremities.

Of particular note are certain rates around the 50 to 60 Hertz, common worldwide for AC electrical systems and transmission, which was shown to affect brainwaves, with a notable decrease in Beta waves and increase Alpha waves, mimicking a sleep-like state.

“Environment affects every aspect of our lives. It’s only natural to expect that vibrations, possibly the most fundamental natural phenomenon, has an effect on our body as well. It appears that the resonant frequencies of various geometric structures in our bodies cause these reactions. We are looking to see how we can apply this in a medical way, such as to decrease healing time, or aid a patient’s paranoia.” ChesterLogoSmall