Think Smaller

In a recent study, researchers at Kern County have found that a larger brain isn’t necessarily a ‘better’ brain.

“Based looking at the quantity of brain mass, both in weight and volume, of individuals and comparing it with their various responses to tests, we have determined that a smaller, denser brain processes information at a faster rate,” says Eric Walhelm, head researcher at Brain and Lung Studies, “The capacity, learning ability and other factors are not affected as much, with no distinct determining factor found among our testing criteria.”

A 5.0% reduction in synapse distance, for example, corresponds to a 2.5% increase in speed from node to node, which manifests as a 7.4% overall increase in speed of thought.

When quizzed as to why this might be the case, he was reluctant to say, “There are too many variables to call this conclusive. All we know is that our preliminary analysis shows a negative correlation between brain volume and speed of thought. Like having shorter roads, you can travel at the same speed and get to your destination faster.”

Pressed further, he suggested that a reduced physical distance between operational synapses allows for less ‘travel time’ of electrical impulses, and therefore faster overall responses. This has led to some speculation that new ‘mind-shrinking’ drugs may be on the cards for investigation, those that boost density by shrinking the volume.ChesterLogoSmall