Mobile Phones Dangerous

The smart phone industry has brought many advances in mobile technology but, along with the good, comes the bad. Eye fatigue and repetitive strain injuries are reportedly on the rise, and along with the common-place medical issues, doctors have seen a rise in other, more obtuse diagnoses.

“I’ve heard anecdotal evidence (from other clinics) that neck and shoulder muscle injuries have tripled. We’ve got a serious rise in the number of direct head and limb injuries related to people walking into poles, falling off platforms and hitting overhead obstacles,” says Sue Sapenard, General Practioner in London’s East End, “People just aren’t paying attention to what’s around them. My colleague (Dr. Brett McMahon) also suspects that there is a link to psychoses like paranoia.”

‘Socal-media Overexposure’ or SMO may become a diagnoses, she says, a condition whereby people cannot ‘switch off’ the social portions of their brain, and so are constantly worrying too much about how they appear to others.

“This can lead to over analysing, repetitive thoughts and the like, which then grows to full blown paranoia,” says Dr McMahon, “We can also see that there is a genuine anxiety tha a phone has being hacked, or that it’s taking over one’s life or even that it’s out of date. It’s the same disease, just with a different context.”

Drs Sapenard and McMahon are preparing a report that they hope will highlight the need to ‘downtime’ apps on phones to be made mandatory, and ultrasonic sensors to be built in as standard to warn about impending obstacles.ChesterLogoSmall

Robo Traffic

Distracted drivers are not at fault, according to new research. The Robotic Automotive Administration yesterday announced that car manufacturers are responsible for the traffic and injuries caused by distracted drivers, not the drivers themselves.

“It’s simple, really. Humans are designed to talk, to look, to interact for short periods of time. They aren’t designed to drive long distances in complicated environments in sub-par conditions. They get tired. They get emotional. So why are we blaming the human when they feel the need to check their social media?” says the RAA release, “If we give a knife to a toddler, can we blame him if he cuts himself?”

Vehicle technology, the report says, has improved in areas of efficiency and comfort, but it has failed to keep up with the trend of mobile phones and social media. The report goes on to cite the lack of a push from car manufacturers to develop automated cars. While it makes no absolute claims, it does imply that they have their own agenda for keeping people behind the wheel.

“We cannot blame social media. We cannot blame communication technology. Above all, we cannot blame the user. We have the capability (to created automated vehicles). We have cameras and sensors, actuators and high speed processors, navigation and traffic warnings. There is absolutely no reason why we cannot see automated cars on the road, which would alleviate congestion, reduce the number of serious incidents and improve the quality of life of all commuters.”